A Week in Kansai

After our work-away we were itching to explore more of Japan. We headed to an Airbnb in Osaka; our base for the week while we explored Japan’s beautiful Kansai region. We’ve had such a jam-packed week, we’ve not had time (or internet capabilities) to update the blog, so here’s a day-by-day run down of our Kansai exploration…

Sunday Night – Dotonbori


Dotonbori is a street in Osaka famous for delicious street food. And on an unrelated note, it is now one of our most favourite places in Japan. It’s like a Japanese Venice, built around a lantern-lit, jazz boat-infused canal, surrounded by buzzing neon lights. The streets are full of vendors selling Osaka’s regional dish, ‘takoyaki’ (fried octopus dumplings), which are to die for. It is worth going to Dotonbori just for them!

Monday – Kyoto

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One of the things on our Japan ‘to-do’ list was to take part in a Japanese cooking class, and Kyoto -home of the traditional- seemed like the perfect place. We were taught by a man called Taro in his home kitchen. He was hugely knowledgable and informative and as a result, we came away inspired….as well as finding out why our miso soup always tastes so bad. Perhaps the main event of the class however, was learning about and eating Kobe beef. There is a reason a steak will set you back £70, because it is the most delicious meat on the planet. Fact.

Tuesday – Universal Studios Japan

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So, we had no idea Japan even had a Univeral Studios Theme park, let alone that it was just 25mins from our base in Osaka. PLUS, in 2014 the park opened a Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which is a big deal. It goes without saying that this was an awesome day, and it was worth queuing for an hour in 35 degree heat just to hear Hagrid dubbed in Japanese.

Wednesday – Nara and Kyoto (again)

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Nara is mainly famous for two things: Its great bronze Diabutsu (Buddha statue), and the copious amounts of wild deer roaming the streets. For centuries, the deer have been considered sacred, which is why their numbers have blossomed, with a little help from friendly food-offering tourists. They are very tame…some would say too tame, as they will not hesitate to try and undo your backpack if they suspect it’s harbouring treats. In fact, they have become so accustomed to being fed by tourists that they have learnt to bow for their food!

(See where Nara’s deer ranked on our ‘Top 5 Animal Experiences in Japan’!)

After this we headed back to Kyoto to see the famous Fushimi-Inari. As the beautiful red toriis (shrine gates) criss-cross up a 4km mountain hike, we chose to do this in the slightly cooler afternoon sun, and we were so glad we did! It was far less busy, and the sunset light scorched off the red gates.

Thursday – Kyoto (one last time)

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There is too much to see in Kyoto! We certainly couldn’t leave without seeing the Arashiyama bamboo grove, which was every bit as stunning as the tour guide photos, although very very busy. After this, we headed to Gion, Kyoto’s geisha district, to take part in a traditional tea ceremony. It was a perfect way to experience the Japanese idea of ‘zen’, whilst enjoying a foamy cup of green tea!

Friday – Umeda

Friday was a bit of a chill day, spent trailing the many many shops in Umeda. We also visited the Umeda Sky Tower: 40 storeys high and considered one of the top 20 buildings in the world, the views were insane!

Saturday- Harie

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On Saturday we explored the small village of Harie which has gained recognition since appearing on a BBC documentary about Japan. Harie is special because of its amazing mountain spring water system. Homes throughout Harie have ‘kabatas’ which are private taps drilled straight into the spring underground. The above picture shows one villager’s kabata, complete with a tank for keeping vegetables cool, and a large pool filled with carp who help clean the dishes!

And that was a breif(ish) run down of our Kansai tour! Next stop: Hiroshima and Shikoku island.

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