Hawaii in a Fortnight

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Japan was everything we hoped it would be, and more. It was for this reason we were somewhat apprehensive about leaving the Land of the Rising Sun, which had well and truly stolen our hearts, to visit its Pacific neighbour Hawaii. This cluster of islands slap bang in the middle of the ocean is synonymous with paradise; one can’t hear the word ‘Hawaii’ without conjuring images of white beaches, palm trees and turquoise waters. Even with this in mind, we were still concerned that Japan might be a hard act to follow.
So, first things first, the negatives:

– Now, this one really surprised us, but we found the people to be -generally speaking-less courteous than in Japan. The Japanese are generally known for being very considerate and polite, you could probably punch a stranger in the face and they would apologise to you. In Hawaii however, small island mentality seemed to be rife- integration or ‘living like a local’ is potentially impossible here. It almost felt as if the entire service industry couldn’t have been more done with tourists. But we can’t blame them too much, tourists are everywhere here, and we hold our hands up, we are pretty annoying.

– Hawaii. Is. Expensive. Accommodation prices were almost double that of Tokyo, one of the most notoriously pricey cities in the world. Food was expensive, activities were expensive, and let’s not forget the Brexit effect. But, the silver lining of this was that we got to fully immerse ourselves in free pastimes, namely getting very very sunburnt.
And now, for the positive stuff…

Oahu

We flew into Honolulu on the island of Oahu and stayed in a hostel on Waikki beach for two nights. As most international flights fly into Honolulu, this island is bustling with tourists, especially families and young party animals. Two days of sunbathing was exactly what we needed after two hectic months zooming around Japan…although in hindsight more suntan lotion was required.

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Jasper needs some sunglasses…

Big Island

We then took a 50 minute flight to the island of Hawaii a.k.a ‘Big Island’. We stayed in a cute Airbnb just south of Hilo which, it turns out, is one of the rainiest places in the US. The climate was like that of a rainforest, with lush greenery everywhere and rain that pours heavily for hours and hours at a time.

As well as the rainfall, the Big Island is known for its volcanic activity. Volcanoes National Park is home to the world’s most active volcano, Kilauea. It is constantly spewing lava which runs slowly (and therefore relatively safely) into the sea, hardening as it goes and creating brand new land. It is the earth giving birth. We hiked the lava fields for a couple of hours, which was an experience like no other and a sight to behold. In the thick of it, all you can see is miles and miles of cooled lava, the rain that was pouring down instantly turned to steam on the hot ground, vents of sulphurous gas billowed upwards, and to top it all off, thunder and lightning battled overhead. It was honestly like a real life Mordor.

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Our next and equally amazing experience on Big Island was our snorkel with manta rays. We’ve been excited by the prospect of seeing mantas ever since Jasper dressed as one for Halloween last year. With wing spans of up to 12 feet but no stingers or teeth, they are the gentle giants of the Pacific. We went on a night time snorkelling session where beams of lights are used to attract plankton, and where there is plankton, there’s mantas. We loved every second watching these amazing animals somersaulting in the water- sometimes mere centimetres from us. It will almost definitely be one of the highlights of our entire trip. Unfortunately we weren’t able to take any pictures of the mantas, so here’s a picture of Jasper dressed as one instead.

So realistic.

Kauai

After spending 6 days on Big Island, we flew to the island of Kauai. This island is often considered one of Hawaii’s most beautiful; it is where Lilo and Stitch is set, and where Jurassic Park is filmed. It did not disappoint. It was far less rainy than Big Island, which allowed for more hours sun worshipping on one of Kauai’s many many beautiful beaches. We spent a day hiking the Na Pali coast, one of the most scenic hiking trails in the world. The windy coastline offered unparalleled views of turquoise oceans, lush rainforests and clear skies- paradise, indeed.

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Na Pali Coastline

Another must-see on Kauai is the Waimea canyon. Mark Twain supposedly referred to it as ‘the Grand Canyon of the Pacific’, and needless to say, it is pretty breathtaking. Unlike the desert, red-rock landscape of the Grand Canyon however, Waimea is speckled with greenery and has waterfalls bursting down its vast chasms. Once at the top of the canyon you are presented with ocean views like no other and a glimpse of the edge of the Na Pali coastline. As cliched as it sounds, it honestly feels like you are looking out onto the edge of the world.

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Waimea Canyon

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View of Na Pali Coast from the top of Waimea

And that was our Hawaii trip! Despite our initial apprehensions, we had an amazing time and fell in love with the Hawaiian landscape; from the rainforests, to the beaches, to the ocean, to the volcanos, Hawaii has so much to see outside of the typical glamorous cocktail resort- and, in that respect, Hawaii well exceeded our expectations.

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